​License # PSY24071

Tax ID # 47-1767028

Clinical Psychologist

​                                                                                                     471767028​



Chantal Young, Ph.D.

Chantal Young, Ph.D.

8235 Santa Monica Blvd. Suite 301

West Hollywood, CA 90046

(323) 412-9071

drchantalyoung@gmail.com

Chantal Young, Ph.D.

8235 Santa Monica Blvd. Suite 301

West Hollywood, CA 90046

(323) 412-9071

drchantalyoung@gmail.com

Using an active, direct approach that will likely feel different than other therapies you may have experienced, I will collaborate with you to turn against old patterns that are keeping you stuck -- so that you may live freely, with strength and self-assurance.


I use a blend of techniques depending on what is appropriate for each patient. Below you can read about some of these techniques.


Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). CBT is often considered the gold standard of research-supported psychotherapies for a wide variety of psychiatric symptoms. The basic premise of CBT is that the content of our thoughts heavily impacts how we feel. For example, if you have clinical depression, you might experience frequent and intense thoughts of self-criticism, guilt, regret, hopelessness, or helplessness. You have probably noticed that these thoughts are quite entrenched, repetitive, automatic, and circle around in your head endlessly. In CBT, it is hypothesized that these thoughts keep you depressed. In therapy, you can learn to identify and challenge negative thought patterns through logical, rational, fact-based questioning. Maladaptive behaviors are also addressed. For example, if you have social anxiety, you likely avoid situations that make you anxious (e.g., public speaking). This is totally understandable, but serves to make the problem worse. In CBT, you will be encouraged to gradually expose yourself to anxiety-provoking situations, which will effectively reduce your anxiety.


A particular type of CBT I specialize in is called exposure and response prevention (ERP). ERP is used primarily for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and other anxiety disorders. It entails gradual, tolerable exposure to fears, along with preventing the maladaptive "response," such as rituals or compulsions.


Emotion-focused therapy (EFT). People come to therapy to feel better, so it makes sense to focus on feelings. If you have been in therapy before, you may have noticed that some of the most effective, meaningful sessions are the ones where you allow yourself to feel and express intense emotions in your therapist's presence. Emotions are incredibly important. They are mechanisms that have evolved in all mammals because they carry important survival-related information. If used correctly, emotions can guide our lives. The trouble comes if you are accustomed to invalidating your own feelings, if you have trouble understanding your feelings, or you are unable to tolerate their full intensity. Emotion-focused therapy is an empirically-supported treatment that will help you to pay careful, caring attention to any and all feelings that come up in our sessions, and learn to use them to your benefit.


Psychodynamic therapy. The premise of psychodynamic therapy is that our early relationships with our caregivers determine our ability to feel secure in adult relationships. As children, we all turn to our parents for love and approval. If instead we are met with criticism, disapproval, punishment, or disinterest, we try to protect ourselves from letting this happen again, often by hiding our true selves from other people. A particular branch of psychodynamic therapy I utilize is called intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP). ISTDP is a uniquely intensive approach that targets these unconscious processes that developed to protect you, but are harming you. These processes are called defense mechanisms, or simply defenses. I will take an active stance to help you face your defenses, face your feelings, and learn that it is safe to be authentic with me. I find that one of the most important factors in ISTDP is the intense in-session experience of previously unexplored feelings toward early caregivers.


Mindfulness is the act of compassionately observing and accepting your thoughts and feelings, without judgment. This ancient practice is rooted in Buddhism and Eastern philosophies and now has strong support from modern science. It has been scientifically proven to reduce a wide variety of symptoms. A goal of mindfulness is to reduce or eliminate suffering. Whereas pain in life is inevitable - from serious pain, such as the death of a loved one, to minor pain, such as your car breaking down - suffering is optional. Suffering is created by the secondary reaction to the pain of life. Rather than observing and accepting the world for what it is, you might start to tell yourself a story in your head about how you don't like what's happening, how you can't tolerate it, how things should or should not happen, how other people should be different, or how you yourself should be different. Now you are suffering on top of the original pain. Through the practice of mindfulness, whether through formal sitting meditation or simply a general approach to life, you can learn to be at peace with no matter what is going on in your life. I enjoy working with patients who have a long-standing meditation practice as well as beginners.


Dialectical-behavioral therapy (DBT) was developed to help individuals with borderline personality disorder (BDP) and chronic suicidality or self-harm. I have worked as a DBT therapist in multiple settings and find the skills to be useful for everyone. These skills help you learn to soothe yourself and regulate intense emotions in times of distress, without making the problem worse by turning to self-destructive behaviors (e.g., self-harm, overeating, procrastination, unsafe sex, addictions, or creating conflict). DBT is particularly useful for women with highly unstable moods or women who tend to have a lot of ups and downs in romantic relationships.


Evolutionary psychology proposes that our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are mechanisms that have evolved to insure our survival. If you understand the evolutionary purpose of your symptoms, you can have more appreciation for them rather than hating them. For example, a panic attack is your body's effort to protect you from something it perceives as dangerous. Without this mechanism, you couldn't survive! However, if you are panicking in situations that are not actually dangerous, we can work with your brain to start turning off that emergency response system. I find it helpful to view our minds and bodies as sophisticated machines, to be revered and guided gently in directions that benefit us.


Existential growth. Life is a mystery. It is essential to face existential questions in order to fully develop as a human being. At different times in your life you will likely be faced with thoughts about life, death, purpose, and meaning. If left unresolved, these thoughts can cause anxiety and depression. Therapy is an ideal place to explore these concerns.


Humor. At the right moments, I find that sharing laughter with my patients is necessary.


Our relationship. At the end of the day, the relationship between therapist and patient is paramount. Research is clear that it is the single most important factor in therapeutic success. Without a solid, trusting connection based on mutual liking and respect, the above techniques are meaningless. Thus I work hard to interact with my patients not just as a clinician, but as a fellow human being. I actively seek feedback from patients about how therapy is going and how they feel about me, and strive to incorporate this feedback to improve my work. By its nature, therapy evokes strong and often conflicted feelings, and a crucial part of the work is discussing these in an open and ongoing manner.